Numbers All Around – Point out or ask your child to find numbers up to 100 at home, at a store, in a newspaper, or in a book. Have your child say the number and perhaps write it in a tablet. You might ask how the number is used. Expand your child’s experience with numbers by asking him or her to find numbers up to 999.

Bigger Numbers All Around – Point out or ask your child to find numbers in the thousands in newspapers or books. Large numbers are often associated with statistical information in reference books, such as almanacs or atlases. Have your child say the number and perhaps explain how great the number is in comparison to another number.

Counting More and More – Help your child practice counting objects by having him or her count things like money or pieces of candy in a large bag. When counting nickels and dimes, encourage the child to count by fives and tens. When counting a great number of pennies or candies, suggest that the child group them by tens to facilitate the counting procedure in order to find the total.

Face Facts – Write the numbers 0 through 9 on a set of ten index cards. Make another set of cards. Mix up the two sets of cards and place them facedown on a table. Ask your child to pick any two cards. Then ask him or her to give the sum of the numbers shown on the two cards to practice the addition facts for sums 0 through 18. To practice the multiplication facts for products less than 25, use only the cards numbered from 0 through 5.

Make and Compare – Help your child learn more about numbers by using number cards 0 through 9 to make and compare two-digit or three-digit numbers. Mix up the cards and place them facedown on a table. Direct your child to pick any two cards—for instance, 3 and 7. Show the numbers 37 and 73, and record them on a sheet of paper. Ask him or her which number is greater or less. Use three number cards to make and compare numbers in the hundreds. To challenge your child, ask him or her to show all the numbers that could possibly be created using one, two, or all three of the cards. Record the numbers. Ask which number is the least or the greatest. For a super challenge, ask your child to put them in order from least to greatest.